SYPHILIS EIA SCREEN
Department: Immunology
Alternate Names for Test: RPR
SEROLOGICAL TESTS FOR SYPHILIS
STANDARD TEST FOR SYPHILIS
STS
TPHA
TPPA
TREPONEMAL SEROLOGY
VDRL
VENERAL DISEASE RESEARCH LABORATORY
WASSERMAN ANTIBODY
Constituent Tests: Syphilis EIA screen. If Positive then confirmatory RPR, TPPA
Specimen Collection Requirements:
Sample Type:

1x Yellow SST (Serum Separator) tube 8.5mL

Minimum Sample Volume: 0.6 mL serum
Alternative Blood Tubes: Mauve (EDTA) tube 4.0mL
In the Lab:
Delphic Code: SYPH
Ultra Code: SY
Lab Solutions Code: SYPE
Testing Schedule: Analysed daily, Monday - Friday.
Turnaround Time: Daily, Monday - Friday
Reference Interval & Interpretation: Non Reactive
or
Further results to follow
Method: Abbott Architect Syphilis TP - CMIA
Stability Time Limit for Add-On Tests: 5 days
Reflex / Confirmatory Tests: RPR & TPPA
Link to Application and Diagnostic Use Website: https://www.rcpa.edu.au/Library/Practising-Pathology/RCPA-Manual/Items/Pathology-Tests
Notes: SAMPLE STORED:
Positive serum aliquots stored in freezer (for approx 1 - 2 years) for any 
future testing that may be required.

LIMITATIONS:
SYPHILIS EIA Screen
No diagnostic test provides absolute assurance that a sample does not contain 
low levels of antibodies to TP, such as those present at a very early stage of 
infection. Therefore, a negative result at any time does not preclude
the possibility of exposure to infection with syphilis.

RPR
Since reactivity in non-treponemal tests for syphilis is a result of tissue 
damage, false negative results may occur  in stages of the disease where tissue 
damage is minimal. This is particularly true in early primary infections and 
during latent stages. Biological False Positives have been reported in patients 
with autoimmune disease (SLE, AntiPhospholipid syndrome), viral infections, 
malaria, leprosy, yaws and a wide  variety of other conditions including 
pregnancy.

TPPA
At the early stage of infection asay may not be sensitive  enough to detect 
specific antibody.  Therefore when infection is suspected, repeat sampling (2-3 
weeks later) should be performed and interpreted in conjunction with clinical 
symptoms, clinical history and other available data.

Application: 
Serum tests: patients with suspected syphilis and contacts; antenatal screening;
blood and tissue donors; patients with STD, HIV infection.

EIA are used as screening tests.
TPPA are used as confirmatory tests.
  
Interpretation: 
Serum tests: the RPR and VDRL are sensitive but non-specific tests. Positive 
results may indicate active syphilis but confirmatory tests for specific 
antibody to T. pallidum are required. RPR or VDRL are also used for monitoring 
treatment. The titre falls with successful treatment, but these tests may not 
become negative unless treatment is commenced early in the course of the 
infection. Biological false positives may be found in pregnancy; transiently in 
eg, measles, chicken pox; chronically in eg, cirrhosis, SLE, the phospholipid 
antibody syndrome, leprosy.

TPPA: positive results confirm the diagnosis of syphilis, but do not indicate 
whether the disease is active, inactive or cured. Titres may remain elevated 
after effective therapy, although they may become negative if treatment has been 
commenced early.
   
 http://www.rcpamanual.edu.au/sections/pathologytest.asp?s=33&i=164 
Reference: Egglestone SI and Turner AJL Commun Dis Public Health 2000; 3: 158-
162.
 
  
    

Contact Details:
Lab Contact: Paul Tustin
Department Name: Immunology
Phone: (04) 3815900
Email: Paul.Tustin@wellingtonscl.co.nz

Test Information last updated on 12/06/2016
Website last updated on 24/07/2017 08:15

Click here to go to the home page   Click here to print this page